Open post

Yamaha P-115 Review – Why this Digital Piano is the Best?

The Yamaha (portable) P series is known for its excellent quality, sufficient connectivity and control functions. These include the Yamaha P-115, a digital piano with a full-sized 88-key and many other impressive features.

This piano is perfect for those who want to perform on stage, especially if you want to coordinate your actions with other players without trying to impose complex functions. Besides using it in concerts, there are still places where you can use the pianoforte. However, for the purposes of reviewing the Yamaha P-115, we will strictly abide by its specifications.

General Specification

Sound

The Yamaha P-115 is equipped with a Pure CF sound engine and is commonly used in the first piano Yamaha P-225 in P-Line. The pure CF sound includes the grand piano 001, which was found at a Yamaha CFIIIS 9 ‘Grand concert, with each recording recorded at several volume levels.

The piano produces a very clear and realistic sound with excellent resonance and attenuation. With this combination, the P-115 can provide a very convincing and dynamic sound, especially when compared to the previous P-105 model.

The resulting sound can be even better, especially when you listen to a pair of high-quality headphones. In addition, there are 14 existing sound instrument options that sound really real. This includes three grand pianos, three bodies, three electric pianos, a vibraphone, a string, a harpsichord and a wooden bass.

There is also a reverberant sound effect that makes the P-115 sound more important and expressive, stimulating the acoustic environment. Reverbs are universal: you can easily choose and customize the concert halls, concert halls, clubs and concert halls on the keyboard.

Touch

The Yamaha digital piano is equipped with a Graded Hammer Standard (GHS) keyboard, balanced and fully weighted to give the user a natural keyboard.

This is similar to the case of the Yamaha P-115. It comes with 88 weights that are heavy on the lower end and heavy on the high end. The piano keys are sensitive to touch, allowing them to produce various sound changes associated with the strength of your touch keys.

You can also better adjust the touch level according to your style of play. This preset has four settings: fixed, hard, medium (default) and soft. When you select a fixed setting, you block the sensor sensitivity, and the piano will produce the same volume, no matter how hard or softly you press the button.

Hard settings produce a dynamic range, from the softest to the strongest, and allow the player to be aggressive.

The harder it is to press the keys, the louder the sound, so you need to work hard to press the keys to create the most exciting sound. The average setting (by default) provides the most natural feeling, close to the piano sound perception.

The P-115 is made of plastic and has no black or ivory, such as some high-quality digital pianos Yamaha.

However, the black keys have a matte finish, which prevents slipping fingers in the wet state. The piano is perfect for any novice pianist who needs a piano feel. His sensation is like an acoustic piano and encourages the right fingers.

Design

The Yamaha P-115 has a compact design that is almost the same as the P-45. Without a stand, it is 52.2 inches long, 11.6 inches wide and 6.4 inches high. The piano can easily be put in a small room, because it does not take up too much space.

Even better, you can put it on the desktop to connect to your computer, but it will be more convenient if you have a special bracket to place it (it looks better).

You have to buy a stand, because the Yamaha P-115 did not have anything at the time of purchase. You can purchase the X-bracket, but if you need a better look, choose a Yamaha furniture set for the P-115 model.

In addition to compatibility, the Yamaha P-115 is also very light (26 pounds) for anyone to carry around. It is easy to store when not in use, especially if you have children or pets that can accidentally fall down during a game.

Acustic systems

The Yamaha P-115 consists of two speakers with amplifiers of 7W + 7W. The speakers sound great, especially considering their size and the power of the amplifier. The speaker is combined with a tweeter to create rich, low-frequency and bright, crunchy high sounds that create a balanced sound.

These speakers are suitable for home use or for working in front of small congregations. They can be easily updated by connecting the piano to an amplifier or PA system for a more powerful sound.

You can also choose whether to turn off the speakers on the keyboard when you connect them to an amplifier or external speakers.

polyphony

Polyphonic counting indicates the number of notes that a piano can play at a time. If the digital piano has a high polyphony, it means that the keyboard can provide sound next to the acoustic pianoforte.

In this regard, the P-115 has improved significantly, especially when you compare it with the previous version of the P-105. When the old version had 128 key polyphonies, its number of polyphony was 192 keys.

The piano also adds a musical instrument for selecting sound and rhythm to make the player more comfortable. Because of the high polyphonic countdown, the piano gives a huge deep tone in all the sounds of the keyboard.

The piano has a more reliable resonance resonance damping, so when paying it can provide a more elegant and natural tone. The key for pianoforte is enough to enable any player to create multi-track recordings and to impose several sounds without exhausting memory.

feature

The P-115 has several functions that make it convenient and enjoyable for playing and learning. In a review of the Yamaha P-115, we’ll look at the modes, the music library, the recording and playback functions. The P-115 has three modes: Split, Dual and Duo.

Split mode divides the piano keyboard into two parts, and you can play various instruments in each section. You can also change the split point on the keyboard. Dual mode helps players to add up two instruments and sounds simultaneously on the keyboard.

The duet mode divides the piano into two, each with the same pitch range. Here, the keyboard can be played side by side by two players when playing the same notes.

This model helps to find out where teachers can play side by side with students. Transposition and tuning. Like many digital pianos, the P-115 does not require any adjustment, but you can use the Transpose and Tuning functions to adjust the pitch of the keyboard.

The transpose function allows the user to adjust the keyboard in semitone steps. For example, if you play a song in the F format, you can change the pitch to play it in C major, without learning it in a new key.

You can also adjust the piano tunes by adjusting the pitch. These are excellent futures, which helped the game very much.

Unfortunately, the piano does not have the ability to configure other tuning system standards, such as clean, primary, clean minors.

Recording and playback

The P-115 has a recorder that allows players to record their performances and store them in SMF format. The recorded data can be changed after recording (changing the sound of the instrument, speed and even adding new notes). Although there is no recorder on the piano, you can record any sound and play it on your computer.

Music Library

The P-115 has a built-in music library consisting of 50 preset songs. You can play songs, practice while playing songs, change speed, pitch, etc. You can also download other songs from the Internet and use USB to download them to the piano and use them as pre-installed songs.

Unfortunately, the piano memory used to record or save downloaded music is limited and allows you to save only one external information, downloaded or recorded.

Article Resource: Yamaha P-115 Review in 2018 by https://digitalpianoreview.com

 

Open post

What are the specifications of headphones?

If you are interested in knowing the type of headset (for example, “How it works” or “Design”, close or open, etc.), you can read the appropriate manual, as this special article will be more devoted to topics, through boxes or web- sites. The term “measuring” headphones at the bottom. Having said that, these words can be important, and there are several “specifications for headphones for technical terminology,” which we hope will help us complete this journey, some of which are more important than others. Here is our list and links to specific terms, if you are considering specific specifications. Otherwise, please do not hesitate to read.

Now I know what you’re thinking. It’s too much, I just want to know what term I need to find, so my music sounds good? Well, if you are looking for really high quality headphones, then you should be familiar with one of these headphone features. Understanding the meaning of these conditions will give you the tools you need to ensure the highest quality sound for your device. So, let’s solve some of these secrets.

Drivers

What is a driver? Simply put, the headphone driver is just a magnet, some voice coils and aperture that can receive electrical signals from your device and convert them into sounds that your ears can receive. They come in different sizes and styles. Often, large drivers mean that you can manage them, but not scale them. While larger discs will give you lower frequencies at lower frequencies, sound will begin to decompose at higher frequencies. Think of it as a big subwoofer in a car or home theaterWilder vs Fury Live Boxing fight online today. They have huge drivers and work well in explosions or 808 drums, but when you hear sounds or violins, the sounds are low or distorted. This is due to the fact that when the high-frequency sound passes, the actual surface of the diaphragm changes its shape, and for large drives the frequency response (which we will discuss later) becomes irregular and causes distortion. Smaller discs can also create very good bass levels, and some up to 6 mm in size provide deep bass without distorting higher frequency sounds. Drives come in different types, with balanced reinforcement, static, flat magnetic and dynamic.

Sensor technology

The headphone specifications vary with the brand, and the sensors are not really one of the products that you should be an expert to buy a good headset. All converters provide you with an electronic signal that a CD or phone will create and convert into sound waves that your ears can receive.

Frequency response

Frequency response is one of the technical terms with which you need to familiarize yourself with the specifications of the headset. The frequency response is the range in which the headphones reproduce the sound. Their spectrum ranges from high-frequency high frequencies (30,000 Hz) to low-frequency bass (5 Hz). Basically, the sounds of bass, treble and midrange that you hear in your headphones are similar to the acoustic system in a car. You can use large speakers for bass, midrange for midrange and smaller loudspeakers for high frequencies. In headphones they are usually combined into one speaker.

In general, the range is from about 5 Hz to 40,000 Hz, although most headphones try to stay in the range of 20 to 20,000 Hz. Noise above 20,000 Hz is not always detected for some people, and the noise level is below 18 Hz, and your eardrum does not sound as strong as it seems. Because not all companies mark their columns as the same, you will see something like “dB” plus / minus. Do not worry, all this means that the sound is perfect for the original recording in the entire frequency range and how accurately reproduced. This is sometimes called “flat” sound. The closer the number to zero, the closer the headphones

impedance

When it comes to headphone specifications, impedance is another technical term that you want to know when buying a new package. When the company lists this rating, you will consider it as a Greek letter to Omega and call it “om”. In short, this rating is expressed in the range from about 2 ohms to over 600 ohms, which basically means that you need to increase the volume to get the desired listening level. The higher the ohms, the more power the device needs to reach this level. Previously, the home stereo system could output enough power to control 4-8 ohm speakers, and it was very expensive. Today you can find high-impedance headphones, which take up only a fraction of the time. However, many headphones with a higher resistance require that the headphone amplifier fully activate them.

sensitivity

Sensitivity is another technical term for specifying headphones that you want to understand. In short, it depends entirely on efficiency. How effective is the conversion of electronic signals from CDs or mobile phones to undistorted sound waves. Sensitivity levels are listed in decibels (dB), and most headsets have a range of 85 to 105 dB. Anything above 110 dB will damage the human ear in a short time. This should be taken into account when the sound source is less than an inch from the ear.

Low-sensitivity headphones require more power from the device to provide you with high-quality sound, but in return they last longer than headphones with high sensitivity. High-sensitivity headphones provide better performance at lower power, but when you turn the volume up to maximum distortion, it becomes a factor, and headphones (and your ears) can be damaged over time.

Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)

Another term that you do not need to be an expert is full harmonic distortion or THD. Your device and headset have different levels of THD and can actually measure them in different ways. THD refers to the comparison of signals from the input and output of the device and is expressed as a percentage. The actual percentage is measured from the base test, and zero is excellent. As for the specifications of headphones, the human ear is unlikely to notice a complete harmonic distortion, especially if you think that most headphones have a rating of 0.1% to 0.005%. Even with noise-canceling headphones, you can still get sound from the outside world. For complete harmonic distortion, the lower the better. Expect as close as possible to zero.

Sound pressure level (SPL)

The sound pressure level is related to the sensitivity level we discussed earlier, so we will not spend too much time here. Although the sensitivity is completely dependent on efficiency, measuring the sound pressure level (or SPL) is the maximum dB level of these headphone outputs. When you see this rating, it will be displayed as dB SPL / mW or dB / mW, and today most headsets and headphones will be in the range of 85 to 125 dB SPL / mW.

Maximum input power

Now that our mind is getting rid of all this complex information, we will now begin to integrate these headphone specifications to help you better understand the importance of maximum power when searching for new headphones. The maximum value of the input power is the power that the headset can support, and is expressed in kilowatts (or milliwatts). Some companies do not list the maximum input power in a headset package or specifications, but you can find this information on the company’s website. The user guide for your source (mobile, amplifier, TV, etc.) should also provide you with this information. This is a coincidence when buying a new headset. Most phones produce about 1 W (0.001 mW), and a headphone amplifier can raise this number to 3 watts (0.003 mW). 3W is a lot of power, and if it does not fit, it’s easy to damage the headphones. Ideally, you need to find the speaker, which is closest to the maximum input power of the source.

Noise attenuation

The attenuation of noise is defined as the loss of acoustic energy. When sound waves pass through space and come into contact with other materials along the way, it loses its energy. For headphones, we are talking about structural materials used to reduce noise and absorption outside the headphones themselves. In most cases, this information is not very useful, and the attempt to find soundproof materials used by the company may be useless. Foam and cotton are the most common, but some companies use acoustic glass for soundproofing.

 

Scroll to top